The Borgias: Micheletto Corella

The Borgias – Sean Harris

Since Showtime’s most recent Micheletto plotline, visits to my site have tripled, so I figure it’s only fair if I make a post specifically honoring Micheletto.  As I mentioned in my other post, Sean Harris is perfect for the role of the cold, calculating killer.  I stand by that assessment, even after “The Choice.”

The Borgias is not known for it’s historical accuracy.  I touched upon it briefly in my review, but this time we’re going to focus on Micheletto.  There isn’t much information to be found on him, but what we do know is pretty much ignored by the show.  Micheletto was Spanish, like the Borigas, one of the reasons he was kept around, I suppose, and not from Forli.  Second, he and Cesare attended school together in Pisa, then later he was known as Valentino’s executioner.  In 1503, he was captured and tortured, but he never revealed the secrets he knew about the Borgias, loyal until the day he died in 1508 in Milan.  Outside of a few specific murders attributed to him, that’s all we know about the historical Micheletto.  In a way, it makes sense, since you wouldn’t want your assassin’s face and history plastered throughout Rome.

That said, there is nothing to suggest that Micheletto’s homosexuality on The Borgias is historically inaccurate.  We are talking about a man who was a professional assassin, and even after he no longer had the protection of the Pope, they still couldn’t find enough evidence to hang him for it.  If a man like that was skilled enough to avoid the noose for assassination, you can be sure that any affairs he may have been having with other men were also kept under a tight wrap.

I, for one, approve of this new development, if only because it means Neil Jordan’s token gay characters are finally have a more significant plot.   Also, they have such beautiful issues, because we have to remember the time frame we’re dealing with.

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3 thoughts on “The Borgias: Micheletto Corella

  1. There is NO historical evidence that Micheletto was gay. Its TV fiction to add spice and interest. I’ve been voraciously reading respected bios of the powerful families who ruled renaissance Italy— the Medicis,, Riaro’s, lucrezia borgia, cesare borgia etc. I am currently reading a fabulous bio on Caterina Sforza. SHO’s The borgias is practically 99% fiction. To say the series is historically inaccurate is a gross understatement ! I’m loving the show but honestly, I separate my literary reading and knowledge from the TV storyline. . ‘The Tudors’ series was a much more accurate portrayal of fact.

    • Well, yes we have to separate The Borgias , from the real Borgias. And I do believe that your reading it´s going to give you a more reliable and deeper information. But, we have to admit that there is a profound lack of information about some characters such as: Juan de Borja, Micheletto himself. I mean we don´t really know for sure (100% sure) about Lucrezia´s looks (not even Caterina´s, Vanozza´s or Giulia´s). So that gives Neil Jordan and actors a lot more freedom to use their imagination. We have to remember that the Borgias were really hated by their enemies and those who win the game ,are those who write THEIR version of the story. So, what it´s common knowledge of The Brogias, is more a black leyend that was born from hatred; perpetuated and blown out proportion (probably) . I believe precisely because of that it´s really hard to give a completely objective description of this family. Even experts differ, there are ones who said that Cesare was the eldest, and others that Juan was. While, some agree that Lucrezia was manipulative, very intelligent and a real part of The Borgias strategy, others made the affirmation that she was just a piece moved by her father and brother, victim of her family. So every expert, novelist or film maker it´s going to give his/her own perspective and/or interpretation of the facts. Nothing it´s completely accurate specially about THE BORGIAS.

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